Use of habitats by resident and migrant birds in and around a golf course on the Atlantic coast of Morocco

Greig-Smith, P. W. (2014). Use of habitats by resident and migrant birds in and around a golf course on the Atlantic coast of Morocco. Bird Study 61(1): 111–120. doi:10.1080/00063657.2014.882289

Abstract:

Capsule: Woodland bird species were more diverse and more frequently encountered on a Golf Course than in nearby habitats.

Aims: To assess the occurrence of woodland birds in the recently created Mogador Golf Course compared to surrounding undeveloped woodland.

Methods: Bird surveys were carried out in four seasons between October 2011 and July 2012, using one-minute point counts to compile species lists for the Golf Course and nearby Woodland. Data were analysed by ANOVA to detect differences between areas and among seasons, for individual species and for the average number of species per count.

Results: Sixty-six percent of species encountered were in both areas, but 29% were only on the Golf Course. The range of species was higher in all seasons for the Golf Course, and over the whole year was almost twice as large. More species were recorded per one minute count in the Golf Course (4.44 ± 0.12) than in Woodland (3.56 ± 0.15). Eight of nine species were more frequently recorded in Golf Course counts.

Conclusion: Establishment of the Golf Course has benefited both resident and migrant birds, owing to creation of new habitats (golf fairways and lakes), irrigation, prevention of grazing and retention of previous habitat.

Mogador Golf Course, Atlantic coast of Morocco

Mogador Golf Course, Atlantic coast of Morocco

Breeding ecology of the Atlas Pied Flycatcher in an old oak forest in northeastern Algeria

Boudeffa, K., Brahmia, Z. & Benyacoub, S. (2014). Breeding ecology of the Atlas Pied Flycatcher Ficedula speculigera in an old oak Quercus suber forest in northeastern Algeria. Bird Study 61 (1): 73–81.
doi: 10.1080/00063657.2013.876971 (Free access)

Abstract:

Capsule: Low clutch size (CS) in the Atlas Pied Flycatcher breeding in evergreen Mediterranean forest was compensated for by relatively high overall reproductive success.

Aims: To describe the breeding ecology of the Atlas Pied Flycatcher Ficedula speculigera in detail for the first time, in an old oak Quercus suber forest.

Methods: A total of 102 nests were monitored during 2010–2012. Breeding phenology, population density, clutch and brood sizes, egg biometrics, breeding losses and breeding success were accurately determined.

Results: The species arrived in the breeding area in late April. Population density was very high with 4.87 (±1.02) pairs/ha. Mean egg laying date (LD) was 19 May and CS averaged 4.92 eggs. Hatching and fledging success were 88.7% and 83.5%, respectively. The number of fledged young averaged 3.8 (±1.66) and decreased with LD (4.2 ± 1.45 chicks fledged per nest at the start of the season versus 2.8 ± 1.56 at the end).

Conclusion: Lower CS compared to Ficedula hypoleuca populations was compensated by relatively high fledging success, thereby ensuring overall reproductive success of this species. Moreover, the Atlas Pied Flycatchers seem to benefit from the lower seasonality in their food in the evergreen habitat.

The Breeding Status of the Glossy Ibis in the Lebna Dam in Cap Bon, Tunisia

Nefla, A., Ouni, R., & Nouira, S. (2012). The Breeding Status of the Glossy Ibis Plegadis falcinellus in the Lebna Dam in Cap Bon, Tunisia. Journal of Life Sciences 6: 776–782.   PDF

Abstract:

The study of the reproduction of the Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) in Tunisia was undertaken from 2008 to 2010. Until the discovery of nesting in 2008, this species had only been considered as wintering in Tunisia. The Tunisian breeding population resides in the Lebna Dam in the north east of the country where it forms a mixed nesting colony with other species of the family Ardeidae ((Bubulcus ibis (Bi): 388 pairs, Ardeola ralloides (Ar): 17 pairs, Egretta garzetta (Eg): 27 pairs), (Bi: 300 pairs, Ar: 25 pairs, Eg: 40 pairs) and (Bi: 400 pairs, Ar: 30 pairs, Eg: 10 pairs) recorded in 2008, 2009 and 2010 respectively). All nests were constructed on Acacia horrida. Laying began in early May. The average clutch size over the three years of the study was 3.44 ± 0.73 eggs (N = 29 nests). Hatching success was 83 % (2.86 ± 1.18 eggs hatched/nest) and 2.65 ± 1.17 hatchlings/nest survived until the age of 10 to 12 days. Egg mortality was 17% during the incubation phase and chick mortality was .2%. No interannual variation was detected in these parameters.

Heronry of Lebna dam in Cap Bon, Tunisia

Heronry of Lebna dam in Cap Bon, Tunisia

Nidification possible de l’Océanite tempête Hydrobates pelagicus à l’île Zembra, Tunisie

Ouni, R., Durand, J.-P., Mayol Serra, J., Essetti, I., Thevenet, M., & Renou, S. (2012). Nidification possible de l’Océanite tempête Hydrobates pelagicus à l’île Zembra, Tunisie. Alauda 80(4): 301–304.   PDF

Abstract:

Possible breeding of European Storm Petrel Hydrobates pelagicus at Zembra Island, Tunisia.

After investigations over five years, the first record of 6 individuals in late June 2012 suggests the possibility that this species breeds on Zembra and Zembretta archipelago in Tunisia.


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Bourgeois, K., Ouni, R., Pascal, M., Dromzée, S., Fourcy, D., & Abiadh, A. (2013). Dramatic increase in the Zembretta Yelkouan shearwater breeding population following ship rat eradication spurs interest in managing a 1500-year old invasionBiological Invasions 15(3) : 475-482.

Les populations d’Ardéidés nicheurs en Tunisie

Ouni, R., Nefla, A., El Hili, A., & Nouira, S. 2011. Les populations d’Ardéidés nicheurs en Tunisie. Alauda 79 (2): 157–166.   PDF

Abstract:

The breeding Ardeidae species of Tunisia.

Nine Ardeidae species breed in Tunisia. About 2,500-3,000 breeding pairs breed each year and more than 12,000 individuals winter. The breeding population includes 8 regular species: Grey Heron Ardea cinerea, Purple Heron Ardea purpurea, Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax, Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis, Squacco Heron Ardeola ralloides, Little Egret Egretta garzetta, Little Bittern Ixobrychus minutus and Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris (for the latter species, breeding is certain but no nest has been found). The Western Reef Egret Egretta gularis is a casual breeder. The Great Egret Casmerodius albus is present all the year round but no nesting has been found.

Premier cas de nidification du Flamant rose dans la lagune de Halk El Menzel (Tunisie)

Hamrouni, H., Alileche, S. & Ouni, R. (2013). Premier cas de nidification du Flamant rose Phoenicopterus roseus dans la lagune de Halk El Menzel (Tunisie). Alauda 81 (4): 313.

First nesting evidence of Greater Flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus) at the Halk El Menzel lagoon (Tunisia).

 Site de reproduction du Flamant rose (Phoenicopterus roseus) dans la lagune de Halk El Menzel, Tunisie (photo: Ridha Ouni)

Site de reproduction du Flamant rose (Phoenicopterus roseus) dans la lagune de Halk El Menzel, Tunisie (photo: Slim Alileche).

Nidification mixte du Héron garde-bœufs et de l’Aigrette garzette sur l’île de Rachgoun en Algérie

Ghermaoui, M., Hassaine, K. & Moulaï, R. (2013). Première observation d’une nidification mixte du Héron garde-bœufs Bubulcus ibis et de l’Aigrette garzette Egretta garzetta en milieu insulaire sur l’île de Rachgoun en Algérie. Alauda 81 (4): 311-312.  PDF

First observation of a mixed breeding colony of Cattle and Little Egrets at Rachgoun Island, Algeria.

Île Rachgoun, ouest algérien

Île Rachgoun, ouest algérien