First Breeding Evidence of Marbled Duck (Marmaronetta angustirostris) in Libya

Etayeb, K. S., Yahia, J., Berbash, A., Wattier, R., & Brochet, A.-L. 2014. First Breeding Evidence of Marbled Duck (Marmaronetta angustirostris) in Libya. Waterbirds 37: 107–110.   doi: 10.1675/063.037.0114
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Abstract:

The first evidence of breeding of Marbled Duck (Marmaronetta angustirostris) in Libya, North Africa, is reported. In June 2012, at Mallaha wetland, in Tripoli, Libya, two dead ducklings were found that were later genetically identified as Marbled Duck. This breeding evidence suggests that this and other duck species may breed elsewhere in Libya. Better knowledge on Libyan, and more generally on North African waterbirds is needed to document the population size and the status of these species. Such information will be important to secure the future of threatened species, such as the Marbled Duck.

                                                        ——————

Observations in 2013 (not related to the article above):

“During the breeding season of 2013, the Libyan Society for Birds (LSB) recorded the breeding of the Marbled Duck (see photo below by Essam Bourass) and Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis) in the Tripoli Treatment Plant, the breeding of Squacco Heron (Ardeola ralloides) and other birds were also suspected”.

يتم هذا الموسم دراسة تكاثر الطيور فى احواض محطة المعالجة بالهضبة وتم تسجيل تكاثر طائر البطة الرخامية Marble Duck والغواص الصغير Little Grebe وهناك احتمال لتكاثر بعض الطيور الأخرى ولازالت الدراسة جارية مع قرب انتهاء الموسم

Information posted by Wagih Bashimam in the Facebook page of the Libyan Society for Birds.

Marbled Duck (Marmaronetta angustirostris), Tripoli Treatment Plant Lagoons, Libya, July 2013.

Adult and chick of Marbled Duck (Marmaronetta angustirostris), Tripoli Treatment Plant Lagoons, Libya, 4 July 2013. (Photo: Essam Bourass).

Thanks to Essam Bourass for the picture.

3ème Colloque International sur : l’Ornithologie Algérienne à l’aube du 3ème millénaire (Les Oiseaux et leurs Milieux)

3ème Colloque International sur : l’Ornithologie Algérienne à l’aube du 3ème millénaire (Les Oiseaux et leurs Milieux)

Date: 19-21 avril 2015

Lieu: Université 8 Mai 1945, Guelma, Algérie.

Dépliant / Leaflet (PDF)

Fiche d’inscription / Registration form (Microsoft Word)

Note pour les organisateurs: il y’a une erreur dans le non de l’association ANAO, qu’il faut le rectifier dans le 2ème circulaire et les fiches finales, merci. Pour les lecteurs, ANAO c’est l’Association Nationale Algérienne d’Ornithologie ET PAS l’Association Nationale des Amis des Oiseaux.

Thèmes traités:

1. Parasitisme et transmission de maladies ;

2.  Bio-écologie (Systématique, Habitat, Biologie de la reproduction et cycle évolutif, Niche trophique, Migrations, Guides,…)

3. Gestion et conservation ;

4. Facteurs de pression et de menace ;

5. Éthologie et biogéographie ;

6. Régime alimentaire ;

7. Dynamique des populations.

Dates à retenir:

30 Mai 2014 : Date limite de réception des résumés.

30 Juin 2014 : Date de notification d’acceptation.

30 Septembre 2014 : Confirmation de participation.

3ème Colloque International sur : l'Ornithologie Algérienne à l'aube du 3ème millénaire (Les Oiseaux et leurs Milieux)

3ème Colloque International sur : l’Ornithologie Algérienne à l’aube du 3ème millénaire (Les Oiseaux et leurs Milieux)

Caractérisation de la faune ornithologique des Monts de l’Ourit dans le Parc National de Tlemcen

Benamammar, H. 2014. Caractérisation de la faune Ornithologique des Monts de l’Ourit dans le Parc National de Tlemcen. Magister en foresterie, Université Abou Bekr Belkaid, Tlemcen.

PDF (5.23 Mb) in Dépôt de l’Université Abou Bekr Belkaid Tlemcen.

Résumé :

L’étude ornithologique des Monts de l’Ourit (Parc national de Tlemcen, Algérie) présentée dans ce mémoire se propose deux buts essentiels :

1. Reconnaitre la diversité spécifique de la classe des Oiseaux diurnes,

2. Proposer, suite à une succincte évaluation patrimoniale, une stratégie que le Parc national pourrait adopter pour préserver ce patrimoine ornithologique.

Des méthodologies adaptées aux milieux rencontrés ont permis de constater que 62 espèces d’oiseaux vivent sur une surface totale de 620 ha, et se repartissent dans l’espace selon une logique écologique : milieux forestiers, milieux agricoles, ripisylve, falaises et éboulis.

Dans le contexte actuel de la préservation des milieux naturels et des espèces, le site des Monts de l’Ourit semble être l’un des très rares sites de la région à abriter quelques-unes des espèces les plus menacées dans le Monde ; et il fait partie d’un réseau d’habitats écologiquement fonctionnel qu’il faudrait dores-et-déjà inclure dans la zone intégrale du Parc National.

Aigle royal (Aquila chrysaetos) adulte du mont Taksempt, à l’oued du Parc National de Tlemcen

Aigle royal (Aquila chrysaetos) adulte du mont Taksempt, à l’oued du Parc National de Tlemcen. (Hafeda Benamammar)

The importance of northwest African stopover sites for Dutch, German and Danish Montagu’s Harriers

From 2005 to 2011, 34 adult Montagu’s Harriers (Circus pygargus) were fitted with satellite transmitters in three different subpopulations in northern Europe by the Dutch Montagu’s Harrier Foundation.

This is the first study to describe in great details the migration system of a Palaearctic-African long-distance migrant. The results of this unique long-term and large scale satellite tracking project were recently published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B:

Trierweiler, C., Klaassen, R. H. G., Drent, R. H., Exo, K.-M., Komdeur, J., Bairlein, F., & Koks, B. J. (2014). Migratory connectivity and population-specific migration routes in a long-distance migratory bird. Proc. R. Soc. B 281: 20132897. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2013.2897 (free access)
PDF also available from the University of Groningen

The study discovered a previously unknown major stopover area in northwest Africa (northeastern Morocco and northern Algeria, figure 3). This area is used extensively both in autumn and spring, predominantly by birds travelling via the western route (i.e. birds from The Netherlands, western Germany and Denmark). In autumn, Montagu’s Harriers made a large number of lengthy stopovers in these northwest African sites. In autumn, 25% of all stopovers were located in northern Africa, whereas in spring 45% of all stopovers were located in this region. Furthermore, in autumn 46% of all individuals made a stopover, whereas in spring 88% of the birds stopped in this region.

This study shows once more that for effective conservation of migratory animals, key stopover sites (where these animals spent a good amount of time both in spring and autumn) need the same attention as the final destinations of the journey (breeding and wintering areas).

A male Montagu’s Harrier (Circus pygargus) is being fitted with a satellite transmitter. Sødernes (DK), July 2011. Picture by Henning Heldbjerg

A male Montagu’s Harrier (Circus pygargus) is being fitted with a satellite transmitter. Sødernes (DK), July 2011. Picture by Henning Heldbjerg

Main stopover sites for Montagu’s Harrier (Circus pygargus), for (a) autumn and (b) spring migration.

Main stopover sites for Montagu’s Harriers (Circus pygargus), for (a) autumn and (b) spring migration.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.2897

Diurnal wintering behaviour of the Marbled Teal (Marmaronetta angustirostris) in north-east Algeria

Aberkane, M., Maazi, M.-C., Chettibi, F., Guergueb, E.-Y., Bouslama, Z., & Houhamdi, M. (2014). Diurnal wintering behaviour of the Marbled Teal (Marmaronetta angustirostris) in north-east Algeria. Zoology and Ecology 24: 10-15 . doi:10.1080/21658005.2014.889870
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Abstract:

The Marbled Teal, Marmaronetta angustirostris, is a globally threatened species, especially in the Western Mediterranean. Its numbers are currently following a downward trend. The population size and status of the Marbled Teal are well estimated in some areas of its geographic range, but in others, such as Algerian wetlands, they are still not known. Population and time-activity budget estimation of the species were carried out in the semi-arid Ramsar wetland Garaet Timerganine located in north-east Algeria in the course of two subsequent wintering seasons. The wintering population showed a significant decrease in numbers from the first to the second year with peaks of 763 and 270 individuals, respectively. This variation was probably due to the abrupt water level rise in the wetland, scarcity of the vegetation cover and availability of many other wintering places following heavy rains in the second year. The time-activity budget was dominated by resting followed by swimming and feeding. Preening, flight and courting were rarely observed accounting for less than 5% of the whole diurnal activity budget. Although the species preferred shallow parts of the wetland, it also used terrestrial habitats near the shore.

Marbled Duck (Marmaronetta angustirostris)

Marbled Duck or Marbled Teal (Marmaronetta angustirostris). (Photo: Vince Smith in lickr, licence: CC-by-sa)