Wind effects on the migration routes of trans-Saharan soaring raptors

Vidal-Mateo, J., Mellone, U., López-López, P., De La Puente, J., García-Ripollés, C., Bermejo, A. & Urios, V. (2016). Wind effects on the migration routes of trans-Saharan soaring raptors: geographical, seasonal, and interspecific variation. Current Zoology 62: 89–97. doi: 10.1093/cz/zow008 (Open Access)

Abstract:

Wind is among the most important environmental factors shaping birds’ migration patterns. Birds must deal with the displacement caused by crosswinds and their behavior can vary according to different factors such as flight mode, migratory season, experience, and distance to goal areas. Here we analyze the relationship between wind and migratory movements of three raptor species which migrate by soaring–gliding flight: Egyptian vulture Neophron percnopterus, booted eagle Aquila pennata, and short-toed snake eagle Circaetus gallicus. We analyzed daily migratory segments (i.e., the path joining consecutive roosting locations) using data recorded by GPS satellite telemetry. Daily movements of Egyptian vultures and booted eagles were significantly affected by tailwinds during both autumn and spring migrations. In contrast, daily movements of short-toed eagles were only significantly affected by tailwinds during autumn migration. The effect of crosswinds was significant in all cases. Interestingly, Egyptian vultures and booted eagles showed latitudinal differences in their behavior: both species compensated more frequently at the onset of autumn migration and, at the end of the season when reaching their wintering areas, the proportion of drift segments was higher. In contrast, there was a higher drift at the onset of spring migration and a higher compensation at the end. Our results highlight the effect of wind patterns on the migratory routes of soaring raptors, with different outcomes in relation to species, season, and latitude, ultimately shaping the loop migration patterns that current tracking techniques are showing to be widespread in many long distance migrants.

Response of three migratory raptors to crosswinds in spring (upper panel) and autumn (lower panel). Egyptian vulture’s routes are shown in (A) and (D); booted eagle’s routes in (B) and (E); and short-toed snake eagle’s routes in (C) and (F). Colors indicate drift (green), compensation (blue), and overcompensation (orange) in daily segments

Response of three migratory raptors to crosswinds in spring (upper panel) and autumn (lower panel). Egyptian vulture’s routes are shown in (A) and (D); booted eagle’s routes in (B) and (E); and short-toed snake eagle’s routes in (C) and (F). Colors indicate drift (green), compensation (blue), and overcompensation (orange) in daily segments

Significant population of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) found in Morocco

Amezian, M. & El Khamlichi, R. 2016. Significant population of Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus found in Morocco. Ostrich 87: 73–76.

Abstract:

The Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus population in Morocco has undergone a marked decline since the 1980s to the point of nearing local extinction in the twenty-first century. A field study of some possible sites for Egyptian Vultures was carried out over six days during June 2014 in the Middle Atlas Mountains, Morocco. We counted a total of 48 Egyptian Vultures at three different localities: two occupied breeding sites and one communal roost that hosted 40 vultures of different ages. A (probable) singe adult bird at the breeding site was located and a previously occupied site was also visited. A preliminary survey amongst local people indicated that threats faced by this species are predator poisoning in some areas, and the use of vulture parts for traditional medicine. Given that the species is considered globally Endangered and populations continue to decline in many areas, the discovered population reported here, although relatively small, is of national and regional (North-west Africa) importance. We expect this new situation will revive the hopes for studying and conserving this and other vulture species in Morocco and North-west Africa in general.

More details / Plus de détails:

The plight of the Egyptian Vulture and hopes for the future.

Traduit aussi en français: Les vautours au Maghreb: une situation critique et espoirs pour l’avenir.

Videos of the communal roost of Egyptian Vultures,  Morocco / Dortoir de Vautours percnoptères:

Adult Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Middle Atlas, Morocco
Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Middle Atlas, Morocco.

Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) in Algeria

Algeria has probably the largest population of the Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) in the Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya), and the species is still well represented in several Algerian regions.

The Algerian National Association of Ornithology (an NGO created in 2013) has a special interest in the protection and conservation of Algerian raptors, and has been monitoring raptors in the region of Oum El Bouaghi (Northeast Algeria), especially during the breeding season.

During the last two years (2014-2015) they found four nests of Egyptian Vulture. One of these nests was successful in 2015 (see photos). The ANAO intends to launch other teams to monitor Egyptian vultures and other raptors throughout the Algerian territory.

Photos by Sarah Messabhia

تضم الجزائر على أكبر تجمّع لطائر النسر المصري أو الرخمة المصرية  في شمال غرب إفريقيا. إذ مازال يتواجد هذا النسر بأعداد جيدة في العديد من المناطق الجزائرية

وقد قامت الجمعية الجزائرية لعلم الطيور برصد هذه الطيور الجارحة في منطقة ام البواقي (شمال شرق الجزائر) وخصوصا خلال موسم التكاثر حيث تم العثور على أربع أعشاش كان أحدها ناجحا خلال هذه السنة 2015، هذا وتعتزم هذه الجمعية إطلاق مزيد من الفرق لمراقبة هذا النوع من النسور والطيور الجارحة الأخرى في جميع أنحاء التراب الوطني

Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria

Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria (Photo: Sarah Messabhia/ANAO)

Juvenile Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria

Juvenile Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria (Photo: Sarah Messabhia/ANAO)

Chick of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria

Chick of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria (Photo: Sarah Messabhia/ANAO)

Egg of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria

Egg of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria (Photo: Sarah Messabhia/ANAO)

Libération d’un Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) victime du trafic illégal d’oiseaux en Tunisie

Release of an Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) saved from the illegal bird trade in Tunisia by the Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO) (BirdLife partner in Tunisia) in coordination with the Directorate General of Forests (DGF). Thanks to the collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Radolfzell), the Egyptian Vulture was equipped with a GPS transmitter to track its movements which will be followed via movebank.

L’Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO), qui n’a cessé d’attirer l’attention sur une véritable flambée du trafic illégal des oiseaux sauvages en Tunisie, est parvenue, récemment, en coordination avec la Direction Générale des Forêts (DGF), a récupérer un jeune Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), mis en vente en ligne, sur un site de petites annonces.

Après une période de réhabilitation chez le vétérinaire de l’association, le jeune percnoptère, maintenant en bon état, a été libéré, aujourd’hui 7 décembre 2014, au Parc National de Zaghoun. Grace à la collaboration avec Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Radolfzell), le Vautour percnoptère a été équipé d’un émetteur GPS en vue de suivre ses déplacements (sur movebank).

Espèce globalement menacée et en continuel déclin en Tunisie et très prisée pour ses vertus thérapeutiques imaginaires, ce petit vautour, “ne risquait pas seulement de passer sa vie en captivité, mais d’être tué et mangé par des personnes dans l’espoir irréaliste de guérir d’un cancer ou d’une autre souffrance grave”, commente l’AAO, dans un communiqué.

Le Vautour percnoptère est un oiseau nicheur migrateur jadis présent dans tous les massifs de la Dorsale tunisienne. C’est un charognard qui se nourrit, essentiellement, de carcasses d’animaux. Il joue ainsi un rôle important dans le maintien de populations saines d’animaux sauvages et domestiques. En 1990, sa population nicheuse a été évaluée à 100 – 150 couples, mais depuis, cette population ne cesse de s’amoindrir à cause du braconnage et du trafic illégal.

L’AAO a déjà mise en garde les sites de petites annonces tunisiens qui continuent à publier la vente d’animaux sauvages contre cette pratique illégale.

Le président de l’association, Hichem Azafzaf, a lancé un appel aux citoyens tunisiens leur expliquant que la vente et l’achat d’animaux sauvages sont interdits en Tunisie et “tout Tunisien conscient et patriote doit respecter la loi et dénoncer ces pratiques auprès des autorités compétentes”.

Le président de l’Association "Les Amis des Oiseaux" (AAO) Hichem Azafzaf, avec le Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus)

Le président de l’Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO) Hichem Azafzaf, avec le Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), sauvé de trafic illégal d’oiseaux, équipé d’un émetteur GPS et libéré.

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), sauvé de trafic illégal d’oiseaux, équipé d’un émetteur GPS et libéré.

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) libre dans le Parc National de Zaghoun

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) libre dans le Parc National de Zaghoun

Sources: Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO) & Babnet Tunisie.

Photos: Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO).

Le Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) est-il en expansion en Algérie?

Le Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) est en expansion dans quelques régions algériennes. Selon le témoignage de Mohamed Bestami, un activiste dans le domaine de la protection de l’environnent, l’espèce est en expansion dans la wilaya de M’Sila au nord de l’Algerie. Cependant, nous ne savons pas si cette observation reflète une augmentation nette de la population ou d’une tendance à observer plus de vautours dans les dépotoirs de la région. D’autres observateurs ont indiqué également que l’espèce est encore présente en grand nombre dans d’autres régions (Parn National du Djurdjura, Parc National de Belezma, Oum El-Bouaghi …), toutefois sans indiquer ni augmentation ni diminution.

En tout cas, l’Algérie accueille probablement la plus grande population du Vautour percnoptère dans le Maghreb (Maroc, Algérie, Tunisie et Lybie), et l’espèce est encore bien représentée dans plusieurs régions algériennes (voir photos ci-dessous).

Il faut rappeler que le Vautour percnoptère est classé dans la catégorie “En danger d’extinction” (Endangered) dans la liste rouge de l’IUCN.

Un grand merci à tous les photographes ainsi que à la page Facebook ‘To Save Wildlife in Algeria’.

The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron pernkopterus) is  it expanding in some Algerian regions? According to the statement of Mohamed Bestami, an activist in the field of environmental protection, the species is expanding in the province of M’Sila in northern Algeria. However, we do not know whether this observation reflects a net increase in the population or a tendency to observe more vultures in the rubbish dumps in the area. Other observers have indicated also that the species still present in good numbers in other regions (Djurdjura National Park, Belezma National park, Oum el-Bouaghi…), however, without indicating neither an increase or a decrease.

Anyway, Algeria has probably the largest population of the Egyptian vulture in the Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya), and the species is still well represented in several Algerian regions (see photos below).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), adulte et immature, Bou Saada, M'Sila

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), adulte et immature, Bou Saada, M’Sila (photo: Mohamed Bestami).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), 2 juvéniles et un adulte, Bou Saada, M'Sila

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), 2 juvéniles et un adulte, Bou Saada, M’Sila (photo: Mohamed Bestami).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) juvénile, Bou Saada, M'Sila

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) juvénile, Bou Saada, M’Sila (photo: Mohamed Bestami).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) immature, Merahna, Souk Ahras

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) immature, Merahna, Souk Ahras, 11 juillet 2014. (photo: Salah Telailia / El-Tarf University).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) adulte, Merahna, Souk Ahras. (photo: Salah Telailia / El-Tarf University)

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) adulte, Merahna, Souk Ahras. (photo: Salah Telailia / El-Tarf University).

5 Vautours percnoptères (Neophron percnopterus) dans une décharge, Souk Ahras.

5 Vautours percnoptères (Neophron percnopterus) dans une décharge, Souk Ahras. (photo: Salah Telailia / El-Tarf University).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) adulte, Béchar.

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) adulte, Béchar. (photo: Redouane Tahri).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) adulte, Djurdjura.

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) adulte, Djurdjura. (photo: Sofiane Djebbara).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) adulte, Oum el-Bouaghi.

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) adulte, Oum el-Bouaghi. (photo: Menouar Saheb/ Oum el-Bouaghi University).

Liste des 8 espèces de vautours du Maghreb (Algérie, Maroc et Tunisie)

Huit espèces de vautours existent ou ont existé dans les trois pays du Maghreb (Algérie, Maroc et Tunisie). Voici la liste complète de ces espèces classée en fonction de leurs positions taxonomiques. Le statut de chaque espèce dans la région est brièvement mentionné.  De ces huit espèces, 3 nichent toujours dans la région (Gypaète barbu, Vautour percnoptère et Vautour fauve), 2 sont des ‘nicheurs disparus’ maintenant éteints de la région (Vautour moine et Vautour oricou), et enfin 3 sont des visiteurs occasionnels (ou accidentels) de l’Afrique subsaharienne (Vautour charognard, Vautour africain et Vautour de Rüppell).

Les vautours qui se reproduisent toujours dans chaque pays sont les suivants: pour l’Algérie (Gypaète barbu, Vautour percnoptère et Vautour fauve), pour le Maroc (Gypaète barbu et Vautour percnoptère) et pour la Tunisie (Vautour percnoptère).

Cet article est est basé sur: A complete list of the vultures of Northwest Africa.

The eight vulture species of Northwest Africa (Maghreb)

Eight vulture species exist or have existed in the three North-west African (Maghreb) countries (Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia). Here is their complete list sorted according to their taxonomic positions. Of these eight species, 3 still breed in the region (Bearded Vulture, Egyptian Vulture and Griffon Vulture), 2 are ‘former breeders’ and now extinct from the region (Cinereous Vulture and Lappet-faced Vulture), and finally 3 are rare accidental visitors from sub-Saharan Africa (Hooded Vulture, White-backed Vulture and Rüppell’s Vulture).

The total number of species in the list of each country: 6 species for Algeria, 8 species for Morocco and 4 species for Tunisia.

The vultures that still breed in each country are as follow: for Algeria (Bearded Vulture, Egyptian Vulture and Griffon Vulture), for Morocco (Bearded Vulture and Egyptian Vulture) and for Tunisia (Egyptian Vulture).

This blog-post is based on: A complete list of the vultures of Northwest Africa.

La liste:

  • Gypaetus barbatus – Gypaète barbu – Bearded Vulture: disparu comme nicheur de la Tunisie, présente encore en Algérie, et il niche toujours au Maroc (mais très rare). Lire:
    – Le Gypaète barbu (Gypaetus barbatus) dans le Parc National de Theniet El Had, Algérie.
    – Status of Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) in Morocco.
Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) juvenile, Hight Atlas, Morocco
Gypaète barbu – Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) juvenile, Hight Atlas, Morocco (photo: Juliette Boyer / Moroccan Birds)
  • Neophron percnopterus – Vautour percnoptère – Egyptian Vulture: il niche encore dans les 3 pays. Mais probablement plus répondu en Algérie que dans les deux autres pays (Maroc et Tunisie). Lire:
    – Le Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) est-il en expansion en Algérie?
    – Significant population of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) found in Morocco.
Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Algeria
Vautour percnoptère – Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Merahna, Souk Ahras, Algeria (photo: Salah Telailia / El-Tarf University)
  • Necrosyrtes monachus – Vautour charognard – Hooded Vulture: visiteur accidentel (ou occasionnel) au sud du Maroc dans les années 1960.
Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus), Northern Serengeti, Tanzania
Vautour charognard – Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus), Serengeti, Tanzania (photo: Vince Smith/Flickr, CC-by-sa)
  • Gyps africanus – Vautour africain – White-backed Vulture: visiteur accidentel au Maroc. Lire:
    – First record of White-backed Vulture for Morocco and North Africa.
White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus) and Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tétouan, Morocco
Vautour africain – White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus) and Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tétouan, Morocco (photo: Rachid El Khamlichi / Moroccan Birds).
  • Gyps rueppellii – Vautour de Rüppell – Rüppell’s Vulture: visiteur accidentel au Maroc depuis la fin des années 1990 (dont plusieurs individus rapportés par Moroccan Birds au nord du Maroc le printemps dernier, par exemple à Jbel Bouhachem et à Tétoaun. Lire: Spectacle: 7 Rüppell’s Vultures in 2 days in northern Morocco.

Il est aussi visiteur accidentel en Algérie (fait inconnu pour de nombreux ornithologues amateurs Algériens). Preuve! Voici un extrait du texte de Chenchouni et al. (2007) : “Les résultats obtenus nous révèlent l’apparition d’une nouvelle espèce à l’échelle nationale dont  l’identification a été faite par Jean-Paul Jacob (Société Aves, Belgique). Il s’agit du Vautour de Rüppell (Gyps rueppellii) capturé par des éléments de la brigade forestière de Chechar, en date du 24 avril 2006 au lieu-dit Siar (commune de Chechar), à environ 60 km au sud de la ville de Khenchela. La présence de telle espèce d’origine du Sahel renvoie la tendance du climat de la région à devenir de plus en plus aride. Cette espèce aurait suivi le même chemin de migration que le Vautour fauve (Gyps fulvus) comme c’est le cas des observations faites au Maroc et en France, pour y demeurer nicheuse car le sujet capturé étant juvénile”.

Rüppell's Vulture (Gyps rueppellii), Jbel Moussa, Morocco
Vautour de Rüppell – Rüppell’s Vulture (Gyps rueppellii), Jbel Moussa, Morocco (photo: Rachid El Khamlichi / Moroccan Birds)
  • Gyps fulvus – Vautour fauve – Griffon Vulture: disparu comme nicher de la Tunisie et probablement aussi du Maroc, il niche encore en Algérie. Lire:
    – Vautours fauves (Gyps fulvus), à Tikjda (Djurdjura), Algérie.
Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algeria
Vautour fauve – Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algeria (Photo: Mustapha Hamoudi / Blida city).
  • Aegypius monachus – Vautour moine – Cinereous Vulture: disparu comme nicher du Maroc  et de l’Algérie. Il  n’a jamais niché en Tunisie.
Cinereous Vulture (Aegypius monachus)
Vautour moine – Cinereous Vulture (Aegypius monachus), (photo: Carlos Sanchez Along / Arkive.org)
  • Torgos tracheliotos – Vautour oricou – Lappet-faced Vulture: disparu comme nicheur dans les 3 pays depuis plusieurs décennies.
Lappet-faced Vulture (Torgos tracheliotos) hunted in Tunisia
Vautour oricou – Lappet-faced Vulture (Torgos tracheliotos) hunted in Tunisia in 1915 (photo: Abdelkader Jebali / Tunisia Wildlife Conservation Society)

Remerciements:

Merci à tous les photographes pour leurs photos. Nous avons essayé d’inclure le plus grand nombre d’images prises dans la région (6 espèces).

References:

  • Chenchouni, H., Righi , Y. & Si Bachir, A. 2007. Mise à jour et statut écologique de l’avifaune des Aurès. Acte des Journées Internationales sur la Zoologie Agricole et Forestière. Institut National Agronomique, El Harrach, Alger: 08-10 avril 2007.
  • Moroccan Birds. 2014. First record of White-backed Vulture for Morocco and North Africa. May 2014.
  • Isenmann, P., & Moali, A. 2000. Oiseaux d’Algérie / Birds of Algeria. SEOF, Paris.
  • Isenmann, P., Gaultier, T., El Hili, A., Azafzaf, H., Dlensi, H. & Smart, M. 2005. Oiseaux de Tunisie / Birds of Tunisia. SEOF, Paris.
  • Thévenot, M., Vernon, R. & Bergier, P. 2003. The birds of Morocco. BOU Checklist No. 20. BOU, Tring.