Taxonomic status of the Atlas Long-legged Buzzard revisited

Quote

A new study showed that ‘Atlas Long-legged Buzzard’ is composed of individuals with admixed genomes of Long-legged Buzzard (rufinus) and Common Buzzard (buteo + vulpinus), but with closer relationship with the latter. The study thus suggested that cirtensis should be treated as a subspecies of Common Buzzard.

La Buse du Maghreb n’est plus une Buse féroce mais une ……

via North African Buzzard is not a Long-legged but a Common Buzzard — MaghrebOrnitho

Wind effects on the migration routes of trans-Saharan soaring raptors

Vidal-Mateo, J., Mellone, U., López-López, P., De La Puente, J., García-Ripollés, C., Bermejo, A. & Urios, V. (2016). Wind effects on the migration routes of trans-Saharan soaring raptors: geographical, seasonal, and interspecific variation. Current Zoology 62: 89–97. doi: 10.1093/cz/zow008 (Open Access)

Abstract:

Wind is among the most important environmental factors shaping birds’ migration patterns. Birds must deal with the displacement caused by crosswinds and their behavior can vary according to different factors such as flight mode, migratory season, experience, and distance to goal areas. Here we analyze the relationship between wind and migratory movements of three raptor species which migrate by soaring–gliding flight: Egyptian vulture Neophron percnopterus, booted eagle Aquila pennata, and short-toed snake eagle Circaetus gallicus. We analyzed daily migratory segments (i.e., the path joining consecutive roosting locations) using data recorded by GPS satellite telemetry. Daily movements of Egyptian vultures and booted eagles were significantly affected by tailwinds during both autumn and spring migrations. In contrast, daily movements of short-toed eagles were only significantly affected by tailwinds during autumn migration. The effect of crosswinds was significant in all cases. Interestingly, Egyptian vultures and booted eagles showed latitudinal differences in their behavior: both species compensated more frequently at the onset of autumn migration and, at the end of the season when reaching their wintering areas, the proportion of drift segments was higher. In contrast, there was a higher drift at the onset of spring migration and a higher compensation at the end. Our results highlight the effect of wind patterns on the migratory routes of soaring raptors, with different outcomes in relation to species, season, and latitude, ultimately shaping the loop migration patterns that current tracking techniques are showing to be widespread in many long distance migrants.

Response of three migratory raptors to crosswinds in spring (upper panel) and autumn (lower panel). Egyptian vulture’s routes are shown in (A) and (D); booted eagle’s routes in (B) and (E); and short-toed snake eagle’s routes in (C) and (F). Colors indicate drift (green), compensation (blue), and overcompensation (orange) in daily segments

Response of three migratory raptors to crosswinds in spring (upper panel) and autumn (lower panel). Egyptian vulture’s routes are shown in (A) and (D); booted eagle’s routes in (B) and (E); and short-toed snake eagle’s routes in (C) and (F). Colors indicate drift (green), compensation (blue), and overcompensation (orange) in daily segments

Open trade in protected raptors at Souk Moncef Bey, Tunis

التجارة غير المشروعة في الطيور الجارحة المحمية بسوق المنصف باي، في تونس العاصمة

هذه بعض الصور التي التقطها أحد أفراد الجمعية التونسية للحفاظ على الحياة البرية يوم أمس بسوق المنصف باي الذي أصبح مكانا معتادا للمتاجرة بالأنواع المحميّة و المهدّدة بالإنقراض مثل هذه الصقور. التجاوزات تتم جهرة و بدون خشية من القانون تضيف الجمعية في صفحتها على الفايسبوك

Commerce illégal des rapaces protégées au Souk Moncef Bey, Tunis

Voici quelques photos prises par un membre de l’association Tunisia Wildlife Conservation Society (TWCS) hier (27 décembre 2015) au Souk Moncef Bey, qui est devenu une place familière pour la vente des espèces menacées et protégées. “Les abus sont ouverts et sans crainte de la loi” ajoute l’association TWCS dans sa page facebook.

Lire aussi:

1) Faune sauvage en vente à Tunis, par Mr Abdelmajid Dabbar

2) Nos oiseaux victimes du commerce sur internet (Algérie)

3) Trafic d’oiseaux sur Internet en Algérie et au Maroc

4) Trafic illégal des espèces sauvages protégées en Algérie via l’Internet

Faucon pèlerin (Falco peregrinus), Souk Moncef Bey, Tunis (Tunisia Wildlife Conservation Society, TWCS)

Faucon pèlerin (Falco peregrinus), Souk Moncef Bey, Tunis, 27 décembre 2015 (Tunisia Wildlife Conservation Society, TWCS)

Faucon lanier (Falco biarmicus), Souk Moncef Bey, Tunis (Tunisia Wildlife Conservation Society, TWCS)

Faucon lanier (Falco biarmicus), Souk Moncef Bey, Tunis, 27 décembre 2015 (Tunisia Wildlife Conservation Society, TWCS)

Mode de prédation très particulier du Faucon d’Éléonore (Falco eleonorae) sur l’Archipel d’Essaouira, Maroc Atlantique

Qninba, A., Benhoussa, A., Radi, M., El Idrissi, A., Bousadik, H., Badaoui, B. & El Agbani, M. A. (2015). Mode de prédation très particulier du Faucon d’Éléonore Falco eleonorae sur l’Archipel d’Essaouira (Maroc Atlantique). Alauda 83: 149–150.

Pas de résumé pour cet article, mais voir les détails de l’article en anglais ici: Eleonora’s Falcons imprison live birds for a later meal (Les Faucons d’Eleonora emprisonnent des oiseaux vivants pour un repas ultérieur).

Voir aussi tous les articles sur le Faucon d’Éleonore (Falco eleonorae) dans ce blog.

Griffon Vultures (Gyps fulvus) at Tikjda (Djurdjura), Algeria

In Northwest Africa, the Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) currently breeds with certainty only in Algeria, while its breeding in Morocco is doubtful, and the species is most likely extinct in Tunisia (read: The eight vulture species of Northwest Africa). Here are some photos of a group of griffons photographed recently by Nadji Kouaci at Tikjda, Djurdjura Mountains (northern Algeria). Thanks to the photographer, and to Nadia Ramdane for sharing the photographs.

Also added 2 videos showing tens of Griffon Vultures attracted by a calf carcass also at Tikjda. The videos were recorded by Hourria Tahia who observed about hundred Griffon Vultures in the area. Thanks.

Les Vautours fauves (Gyps fulvus) de Tikjda (Djurdjura):

En Afrique du Nord-Ouest, le Vautour fauve (Gyps fulvus) ne se reproduit actuellement avec certitude qu’en Algérie, alors que leur nidification est douteuse au Maroc, et l’espèce est plus probable disparue de la Tunisie (lire: Liste des 8 espèces de vautours du Maghreb (Algérie, Maroc et Tunisie). Voici quelques photos d’un groupe de Vautours fauves photographiés récemment par Nadji Kouaci à Tikjda, dans les montagnes de Djurdjura (nord de l’Algérie). Merci au photographe, et à Nadia Ramdane pour le partage des photos.

Ajouté aussi 2 vidéos montrant des dizaines de Vautours fauves attirés par une carcasse d’un veau également à Tikjda. Les vidéos ont été enregistrées par Hourria Tahia qui a observée une centaine de Vautours fauves dans la région. Merci.

Vautour fauve - Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algérie
Vautour fauve – Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algérie (photo: Nadji Kouaci)
Vautour fauve - Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algérie
Vautour fauve juvénile – Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algérie (photo: Nadji Kouaci)
Vautours fauves - Griffon Vultures (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algérie
Vautours fauves – Griffon Vultures (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algérie. Au moins 7 vautours sont visibles dans la photo (Nadji Kouaci)
Vautour fauve - Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algérie
Vautour fauve – Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algérie (photo: Nadji Kouaci)

Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) in Algeria

Algeria has probably the largest population of the Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) in the Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya), and the species is still well represented in several Algerian regions.

The Algerian National Association of Ornithology (an NGO created in 2013) has a special interest in the protection and conservation of Algerian raptors, and has been monitoring raptors in the region of Oum El Bouaghi (Northeast Algeria), especially during the breeding season.

During the last two years (2014-2015) they found four nests of Egyptian Vulture. One of these nests was successful in 2015 (see photos). The ANAO intends to launch other teams to monitor Egyptian vultures and other raptors throughout the Algerian territory.

Photos by Sarah Messabhia

تضم الجزائر على أكبر تجمّع لطائر النسر المصري أو الرخمة المصرية  في شمال غرب إفريقيا. إذ مازال يتواجد هذا النسر بأعداد جيدة في العديد من المناطق الجزائرية

وقد قامت الجمعية الجزائرية لعلم الطيور برصد هذه الطيور الجارحة في منطقة ام البواقي (شمال شرق الجزائر) وخصوصا خلال موسم التكاثر حيث تم العثور على أربع أعشاش كان أحدها ناجحا خلال هذه السنة 2015، هذا وتعتزم هذه الجمعية إطلاق مزيد من الفرق لمراقبة هذا النوع من النسور والطيور الجارحة الأخرى في جميع أنحاء التراب الوطني

Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria

Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria (Photo: Sarah Messabhia/ANAO)

Juvenile Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria

Juvenile Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria (Photo: Sarah Messabhia/ANAO)

Chick of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria

Chick of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria (Photo: Sarah Messabhia/ANAO)

Egg of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria

Egg of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Oum El Bouaghi, Northeast Algeria (Photo: Sarah Messabhia/ANAO)

Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina) in north-east Algeria

Aigle pomarin (Aquila pomarina) photographié dans le nord-est Algérien par Salah  elailia le 25 juin 2015.

L’identification originale semble être incorrecte comme l’ont indiqué plusieurs birdwatcheurs dans la page facebook (Giannis Gasteratos et Alex Colorado Delgado ont été les premiers à le mentionner). L’oiseau est en fait un Aigle pomarin, qui est aussi un bon oiseau parce que non vu ici (comme un oiseau reproducteur) depuis de nombreuses années.

Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina) photographed in north-east Algeria by Salah Telailia on 25 June 2015.

The original identification seems to be incorrect as indicated several birders in the facebook page (first mentioned by Giannis Gasteratos and Alex Colorado Delgado and confirmed by others later). The bird is in fact a Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina), which is also a good bird because not seen here (as a breeding bird) since many years.

Here is the comment of Mattias Nordlund from Sweden:

I suppose you’ve focused to much on the shape of tail which fit White-tailed Eagle. The bird has lost or moulted outer tail feathers which gives this shape. I live in Sweden with many White-tailed eagles. No plumage of any age of White-tailed fits this species you catched here. No need to investigate the white-tailed track further.

The admin of Birding Poland facebook page said:

I would say Lesser Spotted Eagle, for sure not White-tailed Eagle!

Thanks to all for the comments!

Aquila pomarina - Aigle pomarin - Lesser Spotted Eagle, nord-est Algérien, 25 juin 2015

Aquila pomarina – Aigle pomarin – Lesser Spotted Eagle, nord-est Algérien, 25 juin 2015 (Salah Telailia).

Aquila pomarina - Aigle pomarin - Lesser Spotted Eagle, nord-est Algérien

Aquila pomarina – Aigle pomarin – Lesser Spotted Eagle, nord-est Algérien, 25 juin 2015 (Salah Telailia).

Les colonies de Faucon d’Eléonore (Falco eleonorae) du Maghreb (Algérie, Maroc et Tunisie)

Avec la découverte récente d’une importante colonie du Faucon d’Eléonore (Falco eleonorae) dans le littoral oranais, l’étude de la colonie de l’île Sérigina (Algérie), et le suivi de la population de l’archipel d’Essaouira (Maroc), la connaissance sur cette espèce emblématique dans notre région a beaucoup améliorée. Nous résumons ici toutes les colonies de reproduction connues de Faucon d’Eléonore dans les trois pays du Maghreb (Algérie, Maroc et Tunisie), et la dernière estimation du nombre de couples reproducteurs dans chaque site sera cité (si mentionné dans la source):

The colonies of Eleonora’s Falcon (Falco eleonorae) in the Maghreb: With the recent discovery of a large colony of Eleonora’s Falcon in the Oran coast, the study of the colony at Serigina Island (Algeria), and monitoring of the Essaouira archipelago population (Morocco), knowledge about this iconic species in our region has much improved. We summarise here all known breeding colonies of Eleonora’s Falcon in the three Maghreb countries (Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia), and the last estimation of the number of breeding pairs in each site will also be cited (if mentioned in the source):

Algérie:

  • Île Rachgoun (Aïn Temouchent): la taille de la population n’est pas indiquée (Samraoui et al. 2011).

  • Îles Habibas (Oran): 30 couples reproducteurs (Initiative PIM in Rguibi et al. 2011).

  • Île Ronde, côtes d’Oran: au moins 70 couples reproducteurs (Peyre et al. 2014).

  • Est de Tigzirt (Tizi Ouzou): la taille de la population n’pas indiquée mais très petite (Isenmann & Moali 2000).

  • Île Sérigina (Skikda): 20 couples reproducteurs (Telailia et al. 2013).

  • Kef Amor (Chetaïbi, Annaba): la taille de la population n’est pas indiquée (Samraoui et al. 2011).

Maroc (côte atlantique):

  • Archipel de Mogador (Essaouira): 907 couples reproducteurs (GREPOM & Initiative PIM 2014).

  • Falaises de Sidi Moussa (Salé): 14 couples reproducteurs (Rguibi et al. 2011).

Tunisie:

  • Archipel de La Galite (Bizerte): 150-180 couples reproducteurs (Ouni 2013).

  • Îles Fratelli (Bizerte): 40-52 couples reproducteurs (Ouni 2013).

References:

  • Isenmann, P. & Moali, A. 2000. Oiseaux d’Algérie / Birds of Algeria. SEOF, Paris.

Exactly the same report in English is here:
Rguibi, H., Qninba, A. & Benhoussa, A. 2012. Eleonora’s Falcon, Falco eleonorae, Updated state of knowledge and conservation of the nesting populations of the Mediterranean Small Islands. Initiative PIM. 19 p.

Le Gypaète barbu (Gypaetus barbatus) dans le Parc National de Theniet El Had (Algérie)

Djardini, L. Ouar, D. & Fellous, A. 2014. Le Gypaète barbu dans le ciel du Parc National de Theniet El Had. Atlantica (revue du P. N. de Theniet El Had) 1:  3-4.

Adults of Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) observed in the Theniet El Had National Park (northern Algeria) in springs of 2012 and 2014 (staff of the Theniet El Had N. P. and the ‘National Agency for the Conservation of Nature’, see the names in picture 2 under the title).

Extrait du texte :

“Le Parc National de Theniet El Had, connu sous la dénomination de Parc des Cèdres
“El Medad“, est situé dans la continuité de la ligne de reliefs et de montagnes des monts de l’Ouarsenis.

Il s’enorgueillit de détenir encore en son sein prés d’une douzaine de rapaces diurnes où “oiseaux de proies“ qui en tant que prédateurs supérieurs sont très sensibles et font figure d’indicateurs biologiques du bon fonctionnement des écosystèmes naturels.

Voici qu’un visiteur de marque vient d’apparaître dans le ciel du Parc de Theniet El Had : Le Gypaète barbu connu sous son nom scientifique de Gypaetus barbatus barbatus.

…………

Observations récentes :

De nouvelles observations supplémentaires aux printemps 2012 et 2014 d’adultes planant sur les hauteurs du Parc National de Theniet El Had, ont redonné du souffle à l’équipe du Parc afin d’approfondir ses connaissances sur ce très rare rapace particulièrement sur son utilisation du territoire, et sur ses corridors biologiques choisis.

Un travail d’investigation et de suivi et en cours d’élaboration”.

Les deux pages de Atlantica, la revue du Parc National de Theniet El Had:

Gypaète barbu (Gypaetus barbatus) dans le Parc National de Theniet El Had, Algérie
Le Gypaète barbu dans le ciel du Parc National de Theniet El Had (page 1)
Gypaète barbu (Gypaetus barbatus) dans le Parc National de Theniet El Had, Algérie
Le Gypaète barbu dans le ciel du Parc National de Theniet El Had (page 2)

Libération d’un Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) victime du trafic illégal d’oiseaux en Tunisie

Release of an Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) saved from the illegal bird trade in Tunisia by the Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO) (BirdLife partner in Tunisia) in coordination with the Directorate General of Forests (DGF). Thanks to the collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Radolfzell), the Egyptian Vulture was equipped with a GPS transmitter to track its movements which will be followed via movebank.

L’Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO), qui n’a cessé d’attirer l’attention sur une véritable flambée du trafic illégal des oiseaux sauvages en Tunisie, est parvenue, récemment, en coordination avec la Direction Générale des Forêts (DGF), a récupérer un jeune Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), mis en vente en ligne, sur un site de petites annonces.

Après une période de réhabilitation chez le vétérinaire de l’association, le jeune percnoptère, maintenant en bon état, a été libéré, aujourd’hui 7 décembre 2014, au Parc National de Zaghoun. Grace à la collaboration avec Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Radolfzell), le Vautour percnoptère a été équipé d’un émetteur GPS en vue de suivre ses déplacements (sur movebank).

Espèce globalement menacée et en continuel déclin en Tunisie et très prisée pour ses vertus thérapeutiques imaginaires, ce petit vautour, “ne risquait pas seulement de passer sa vie en captivité, mais d’être tué et mangé par des personnes dans l’espoir irréaliste de guérir d’un cancer ou d’une autre souffrance grave”, commente l’AAO, dans un communiqué.

Le Vautour percnoptère est un oiseau nicheur migrateur jadis présent dans tous les massifs de la Dorsale tunisienne. C’est un charognard qui se nourrit, essentiellement, de carcasses d’animaux. Il joue ainsi un rôle important dans le maintien de populations saines d’animaux sauvages et domestiques. En 1990, sa population nicheuse a été évaluée à 100 – 150 couples, mais depuis, cette population ne cesse de s’amoindrir à cause du braconnage et du trafic illégal.

L’AAO a déjà mise en garde les sites de petites annonces tunisiens qui continuent à publier la vente d’animaux sauvages contre cette pratique illégale.

Le président de l’association, Hichem Azafzaf, a lancé un appel aux citoyens tunisiens leur expliquant que la vente et l’achat d’animaux sauvages sont interdits en Tunisie et “tout Tunisien conscient et patriote doit respecter la loi et dénoncer ces pratiques auprès des autorités compétentes”.

Le président de l’Association "Les Amis des Oiseaux" (AAO) Hichem Azafzaf, avec le Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus)

Le président de l’Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO) Hichem Azafzaf, avec le Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus).

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), sauvé de trafic illégal d’oiseaux, équipé d’un émetteur GPS et libéré.

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus), sauvé de trafic illégal d’oiseaux, équipé d’un émetteur GPS et libéré.

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) libre dans le Parc National de Zaghoun

Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) libre dans le Parc National de Zaghoun

Sources: Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO) & Babnet Tunisie.

Photos: Association “Les Amis des Oiseaux” (AAO).