Common Buttonquail shot in Algeria by a local hunter

The Common Buttonquail (Turnix sylvaticus) has not been observed in Algeria since almost three decades.

A hunter had mistaken the bird for Common Quail (Coturnix coturnix) and shot it in the northeast of the country in late November 2019.

More at MaghrebOrnitho: Andalusian Buttonquail observed in Algeria for the first time in three decades.

Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina) in north-east Algeria

Aigle pomarin (Aquila pomarina) photographié dans le nord-est Algérien par Salah  elailia le 25 juin 2015.

L’identification originale semble être incorrecte comme l’ont indiqué plusieurs birdwatcheurs dans la page facebook (Giannis Gasteratos et Alex Colorado Delgado ont été les premiers à le mentionner). L’oiseau est en fait un Aigle pomarin, qui est aussi un bon oiseau parce que non vu ici (comme un oiseau reproducteur) depuis de nombreuses années.

Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina) photographed in north-east Algeria by Salah Telailia on 25 June 2015.

The original identification seems to be incorrect as indicated several birders in the facebook page (first mentioned by Giannis Gasteratos and Alex Colorado Delgado and confirmed by others later). The bird is in fact a Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina), which is also a good bird because not seen here (as a breeding bird) since many years.

Here is the comment of Mattias Nordlund from Sweden:

I suppose you’ve focused to much on the shape of tail which fit White-tailed Eagle. The bird has lost or moulted outer tail feathers which gives this shape. I live in Sweden with many White-tailed eagles. No plumage of any age of White-tailed fits this species you catched here. No need to investigate the white-tailed track further.

The admin of Birding Poland facebook page said:

I would say Lesser Spotted Eagle, for sure not White-tailed Eagle!

Thanks to all for the comments!

Aquila pomarina - Aigle pomarin - Lesser Spotted Eagle, nord-est Algérien, 25 juin 2015

Aquila pomarina – Aigle pomarin – Lesser Spotted Eagle, nord-est Algérien, 25 juin 2015 (Salah Telailia).

Aquila pomarina - Aigle pomarin - Lesser Spotted Eagle, nord-est Algérien

Aquila pomarina – Aigle pomarin – Lesser Spotted Eagle, nord-est Algérien, 25 juin 2015 (Salah Telailia).

Nouvelles données sur l’avifaune de Tunisie (2005-2014)

Azafzaf, H., Feltrup Azafzaf, C., Dlensi, H. & Isenmann, P. 2015. Nouvelles données sur l’avifaune de Tunisie (2005-2014). Alauda 83: 7–28.
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Après la liste complète commentée des oiseaux de Tunisie publiée en 2005, cette publication traite des observations récoltées entre 2005 et 2014. Dix (ou peut-être douze) nouvelles espèces pour ce pays on pu être ajoutées (Flamant nain, Aigle impérial, Glaréole à ailes noires, Chevalier grivelé, Bécasseau de Bonaparte, Chevalier à pattes jaunes, Mouette de sabine, Perruche à collier, Bergeronnette citrine, Pouillot de Pallas et, peut-être, Sterne royale et Rousserolle africaine. Quatre espèces ont niché pour la première fois (Puffin yelkouan, Ibis falcinelle, Mouette rieuse, Bergeronnette des ruisseaux) et la nidification de deux autres espèces reste à confirmer (Autour des palombes et Rousserolle africaine). Quelques especes rarement observées ont été revues (Plongeon catmarin, Grèbe jougris, Fuligule milouinan, Macreuse noir, Tantale ibis, Aigle criard, Pluvier bronzé, Vanneau sociable, Phalarope à bec large, Mouette à tête grise, Goéland pontique, Martinet cafre, Guêpier de perse, Corneille mantelée, Pinson du Nord). Le Courlis à bec grêle qui n’a pas été revu ces dernières années doit été considéré comme éteint.

New bird records in Tunisia (2005-2014).

After the comprehensive annotated checklist of the birds of Tunisia published in 2005, this report deals with records collected between 2005 and 2014. Ten (or perhaps eleven) new species for the country could be added (Lesser Flamingo, Eastern Imperial Eagle, Black-winged Pratincole, Spotted Sandpiper, White-rumped Sandpiper, Lesser Yellowlegs, Sabine’s Gull, Rose-ringed Parakeet, Citrine Wagtail, Palla’s Leaf Warbler and presumably African Reed Warbler). Four species were found breeding for the first time (Yelkouan Shearwater, Glossy Ibis, Black-headed Gull, Grey Wagtail) and the breeding of two others need to be confirmed (Northern Goshawk, African Reed Warbler). Some rarely recorded species have been recorded again (Red-throated Diver, Red-necked Grebe, Yellow-billed Stork, Greater Scaup, Greater Spotted Eagle, American Golden Plover, Sociable Lapwing, Red Phalarope, Grey-hooded Gull, Caspian Gull, White-rumped Swift, Blue-cheeked Bee-eater, Hooded Crow, Brambling). The Slender-billed Curlew having not been recorded in recent years must be considered as extinct.

Nouvelles données sur l’avifaune de Tunisie (2005-2014)

Azafzaf, H., Feltrup Azafzaf, C., Dlensi, H. & Isenmann, P. 2015. Nouvelles données sur l’avifaune de Tunisie (2005-2014). Alauda 83: 7–28.

New bird records in Tunisia (2005-2014).

Azafzaf, H., Feltrup Azafzaf, C., Dlensi, H. & Isenmann, P. 2015. Nouvelles données sur l’avifaune de Tunisie (2005-2014). Alauda 83: 7–28.

First record of Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) for Tunisia

Bradshaw, Chr. G. 2015. First record of Lesser Yellowlegs Tringa flavipes for Tunisia. Bulletin of the African Bird Club 22 (1): 82-83.

This short note describes the first Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) for Tunisia. The bird was observed at a wetland near Douz, southern Tunisia on 18 March 2014.

Cette note brève décrite la première observation du Petit Chevalier (Tringa flavipes) pour la Tunisie. L’oiseau a été observé dans une zone humide près de Douz, sud de la Tunisie le 18 Mars 2014.

Lesser Yellowlegs - Chevalier à pattes jaunes (Tringa flavipes)

Lesser Yellowlegs – Chevalier à pattes jaunes (Tringa flavipes), Jamaica Bay (New York). (photo: Wolfgang Wander, license: GFDL-1.2, via Wikipedia).

4th Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva) for Tunisia found at Djerba, Gulf of Gabes

A Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva) was found at Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabès (Tunisia) on the 5th January 2015 by Italian ornithologists Andrea Corso and Michele Viganò and observed also by Loris Golinelli  and Chiara Sibona from Italy and Leslie Parks from the US. This is the 4th record for Tunisia.

Un Pluvier fauve (Pluvialis fulva) a été observé à Djerba, dans le golfe de Gabès (Tunisie) le 5 janvier 2015 par les ornithologues italiens Andrea Corso et Michele Viganò et observé aussi par un groupe de bird-watcheurs (voir ci-dessus). C’est la 4ème observation pour la Tunisie de cette espèce rare qui se reproduit au Nord et l’Est de la Russie et l’Ouest de l’Alaska.

Andrea kindly sent us this observation along with the excellent photographs of the bird that Michele took. The following is the email of Andrea:

“Hello my friend

I am a true lover of N African birds and fauna and I visit Tunisia, Morocco, Sinai every year 2 to 5 times.

So, I send here with photos of the 4th Tunisia Pacific Golden Plover, I found with Michele Viganò (who made these photos for the documentation) at Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabès, on 5th January 2015. You may like to put them on line on your wonderful webpage that I like so much !!

In Tunisia, previous records were:

1) Killed on 7 November 1915 at Sousse (Blanchiet 1955)

2) Observed on 24 February 1999 at Mahras / Sfax (Aye & Roth 2001);

3) On 29 February 2004 again at Mahras / Sfax.

Thanks to my friend Ridha Ouni”.

Many thanks to Andrea Corso for sending this record and for his kind words, and to Michele Viganò for the excellent set of photographs and also to their friend Ridha Ouni and to the rest of the group.

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia (photo: Michele Viganò).

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia (photo: Michele Viganò).

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia (photo: Michele Viganò).

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia (photo: Michele Viganò).

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia (photo: Michele Viganò).

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia (photo: Michele Viganò).

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia

Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Djerba Island, Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia (photo: Michele Viganò).

Post-release monitoring of Double-spurred Francolin (Francolinus bicalcaratus ayesha) in Morocco

Hanane, S. & Qninba, A. (2014). Post-release monitoring of a critically endangered galliform subspecies, Francolinus bicalcaratus ayesha, in Morocco: a field study using playback call counts. Zoology and Ecology 24: 332–338.  doi: 10.1080/21658005.2014.981431
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Abstract:

The Double-spurred Francolin Francolinus bicalcaratus ayesha is a critically endangered galliform subspecies in Morocco. To improve the viability of this threatened population, 300 captive-bred francolins were released into the Didactic Lot of the Royal Moroccan Federation of Hunting, and post-release monitoring was conducted. In this study, we used playback call counts to assess differences in habitat use and temporal variations in vocal activity of Double-spurred Francolins. The number of male calls per point count was significantly higher in the wooden matorral (WM) than in the non-wooden matorral (MT). The male responses per point count also increased depending on date, reaching a maximum in the first 10 days of March. The pattern was similar in the two habitats, although the maximum average call rates were significantly different [WM = 1.575 (95% CI: 1.394–1.780), MT = 0.481 (95% CI: 0.393–0.589)]. We suggest that call counts collected during this period could be used to index the annual change of the released population in that area. Further researches are, however, needed to (1) estimate the current population size of the released francolins and (2) characterize the habitats used within this protected area.

Double-spurred Francolin - Francolin à double éperon (Pternistis bicalcaratus ayesha)

Double-spurred Francolin – Francolin à double éperon (Pternistis bicalcaratus ayesha), Morocco. (photo: Groupe de Recherche pour la Protection des Oiseaux au Maroc, GREPOM)

Le Gypaète barbu (Gypaetus barbatus) dans le Parc National de Theniet El Had (Algérie)

Djardini, L. Ouar, D. & Fellous, A. 2014. Le Gypaète barbu dans le ciel du Parc National de Theniet El Had. Atlantica (revue du P. N. de Theniet El Had) 1:  3-4.

Adults of Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) observed in the Theniet El Had National Park (northern Algeria) in springs of 2012 and 2014 (staff of the Theniet El Had N. P. and the ‘National Agency for the Conservation of Nature’, see the names in picture 2 under the title).

Extrait du texte :

“Le Parc National de Theniet El Had, connu sous la dénomination de Parc des Cèdres
“El Medad“, est situé dans la continuité de la ligne de reliefs et de montagnes des monts de l’Ouarsenis.

Il s’enorgueillit de détenir encore en son sein prés d’une douzaine de rapaces diurnes où “oiseaux de proies“ qui en tant que prédateurs supérieurs sont très sensibles et font figure d’indicateurs biologiques du bon fonctionnement des écosystèmes naturels.

Voici qu’un visiteur de marque vient d’apparaître dans le ciel du Parc de Theniet El Had : Le Gypaète barbu connu sous son nom scientifique de Gypaetus barbatus barbatus.

…………

Observations récentes :

De nouvelles observations supplémentaires aux printemps 2012 et 2014 d’adultes planant sur les hauteurs du Parc National de Theniet El Had, ont redonné du souffle à l’équipe du Parc afin d’approfondir ses connaissances sur ce très rare rapace particulièrement sur son utilisation du territoire, et sur ses corridors biologiques choisis.

Un travail d’investigation et de suivi et en cours d’élaboration”.

Les deux pages de Atlantica, la revue du Parc National de Theniet El Had:

Gypaète barbu (Gypaetus barbatus) dans le Parc National de Theniet El Had, Algérie
Le Gypaète barbu dans le ciel du Parc National de Theniet El Had (page 1)
Gypaète barbu (Gypaetus barbatus) dans le Parc National de Theniet El Had, Algérie
Le Gypaète barbu dans le ciel du Parc National de Theniet El Had (page 2)

Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) at Lebna dam, Cap Bon: 2nd for Tunisia

Un Vanneau sociable (Vanellus gregarius) observé en novembre 2014 au barrage Lebna, Cap Bon, nord de la Tunisie par Csaba Pigniczki et Mohamed Ali Dakhli.

A Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) observed in November 2014 at Lebna Reservoir, Cap Bon, northern Tunisia by Csaba Pigniczki and Mohamed Ali Dakhli. The team were surveying the coastal wetlands of Tunisia (from Bizerte to Zarzis) to count and read the colour-rings of the wintering Eurasian Spoonbills (Platalea leucorodia) among other things. This is the second observation of this rare species in Tunisia, the first one was in March 1975 near Tabarka.

The Sociable Lapwing breeds in Kazakhstan and adjacent parts of Russia and winters in Sudan, Eritrea, eastern Arabian Peninsula, Pakistan and India (see map below). It is listed as Critically Endangered in the IUCN red list. In the western Mediterranean region, especially in the south, the species is a very rare visitor.

Thanks to both birdwatchers for the observation!

Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarious), Lebna Reservoir, Cap Bon, Tunisia

Sociable Lapwing – Vanneau sociable (Vanellus gregarious), Lebna Reservoir, Cap Bon, northern Tunisia (photo: Csaba Pigniczki).

Sociable Lapwing - Vanneau sociable (Vanellus gregarious), Cap Bon, Tunisia

Sociable Lapwing – Vanneau sociable (Vanellus gregarious), Lebna Reservoir, Cap Bon, northern Tunisia. (photo: Csaba Pigniczki).

Global distribution of Sociable Lapwings (Vanellus gregarious) (map: BirdLife International).

Global distribution of Sociable Lapwings (Vanellus gregarious) (map: BirdLife International).

Liste des 8 espèces de vautours du Maghreb (Algérie, Maroc et Tunisie)

Huit espèces de vautours existent ou ont existé dans les trois pays du Maghreb (Algérie, Maroc et Tunisie). Voici la liste complète de ces espèces classée en fonction de leurs positions taxonomiques. Le statut de chaque espèce dans la région est brièvement mentionné.  De ces huit espèces, 3 nichent toujours dans la région (Gypaète barbu, Vautour percnoptère et Vautour fauve), 2 sont des ‘nicheurs disparus’ maintenant éteints de la région (Vautour moine et Vautour oricou), et enfin 3 sont des visiteurs occasionnels (ou accidentels) de l’Afrique subsaharienne (Vautour charognard, Vautour africain et Vautour de Rüppell).

Les vautours qui se reproduisent toujours dans chaque pays sont les suivants: pour l’Algérie (Gypaète barbu, Vautour percnoptère et Vautour fauve), pour le Maroc (Gypaète barbu et Vautour percnoptère) et pour la Tunisie (Vautour percnoptère).

Cet article est est basé sur: A complete list of the vultures of Northwest Africa.

The eight vulture species of Northwest Africa (Maghreb)

Eight vulture species exist or have existed in the three North-west African (Maghreb) countries (Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia). Here is their complete list sorted according to their taxonomic positions. Of these eight species, 3 still breed in the region (Bearded Vulture, Egyptian Vulture and Griffon Vulture), 2 are ‘former breeders’ and now extinct from the region (Cinereous Vulture and Lappet-faced Vulture), and finally 3 are rare accidental visitors from sub-Saharan Africa (Hooded Vulture, White-backed Vulture and Rüppell’s Vulture).

The total number of species in the list of each country: 6 species for Algeria, 8 species for Morocco and 4 species for Tunisia.

The vultures that still breed in each country are as follow: for Algeria (Bearded Vulture, Egyptian Vulture and Griffon Vulture), for Morocco (Bearded Vulture and Egyptian Vulture) and for Tunisia (Egyptian Vulture).

This blog-post is based on: A complete list of the vultures of Northwest Africa.

La liste:

  • Gypaetus barbatus – Gypaète barbu – Bearded Vulture: disparu comme nicheur de la Tunisie, présente encore en Algérie, et il niche toujours au Maroc (mais très rare). Lire:
    – Le Gypaète barbu (Gypaetus barbatus) dans le Parc National de Theniet El Had, Algérie.
    – Status of Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) in Morocco.
Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) juvenile, Hight Atlas, Morocco
Gypaète barbu – Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) juvenile, Hight Atlas, Morocco (photo: Juliette Boyer / Moroccan Birds)
  • Neophron percnopterus – Vautour percnoptère – Egyptian Vulture: il niche encore dans les 3 pays. Mais probablement plus répondu en Algérie que dans les deux autres pays (Maroc et Tunisie). Lire:
    – Le Vautour percnoptère (Neophron percnopterus) est-il en expansion en Algérie?
    – Significant population of Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) found in Morocco.
Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Algeria
Vautour percnoptère – Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus), Merahna, Souk Ahras, Algeria (photo: Salah Telailia / El-Tarf University)
  • Necrosyrtes monachus – Vautour charognard – Hooded Vulture: visiteur accidentel (ou occasionnel) au sud du Maroc dans les années 1960.
Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus), Northern Serengeti, Tanzania
Vautour charognard – Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus), Serengeti, Tanzania (photo: Vince Smith/Flickr, CC-by-sa)
  • Gyps africanus – Vautour africain – White-backed Vulture: visiteur accidentel au Maroc. Lire:
    – First record of White-backed Vulture for Morocco and North Africa.
White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus) and Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tétouan, Morocco
Vautour africain – White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus) and Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tétouan, Morocco (photo: Rachid El Khamlichi / Moroccan Birds).
  • Gyps rueppellii – Vautour de Rüppell – Rüppell’s Vulture: visiteur accidentel au Maroc depuis la fin des années 1990 (dont plusieurs individus rapportés par Moroccan Birds au nord du Maroc le printemps dernier, par exemple à Jbel Bouhachem et à Tétoaun. Lire: Spectacle: 7 Rüppell’s Vultures in 2 days in northern Morocco.

Il est aussi visiteur accidentel en Algérie (fait inconnu pour de nombreux ornithologues amateurs Algériens). Preuve! Voici un extrait du texte de Chenchouni et al. (2007) : “Les résultats obtenus nous révèlent l’apparition d’une nouvelle espèce à l’échelle nationale dont  l’identification a été faite par Jean-Paul Jacob (Société Aves, Belgique). Il s’agit du Vautour de Rüppell (Gyps rueppellii) capturé par des éléments de la brigade forestière de Chechar, en date du 24 avril 2006 au lieu-dit Siar (commune de Chechar), à environ 60 km au sud de la ville de Khenchela. La présence de telle espèce d’origine du Sahel renvoie la tendance du climat de la région à devenir de plus en plus aride. Cette espèce aurait suivi le même chemin de migration que le Vautour fauve (Gyps fulvus) comme c’est le cas des observations faites au Maroc et en France, pour y demeurer nicheuse car le sujet capturé étant juvénile”.

Rüppell's Vulture (Gyps rueppellii), Jbel Moussa, Morocco
Vautour de Rüppell – Rüppell’s Vulture (Gyps rueppellii), Jbel Moussa, Morocco (photo: Rachid El Khamlichi / Moroccan Birds)
  • Gyps fulvus – Vautour fauve – Griffon Vulture: disparu comme nicher de la Tunisie et probablement aussi du Maroc, il niche encore en Algérie. Lire:
    – Vautours fauves (Gyps fulvus), à Tikjda (Djurdjura), Algérie.
Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algeria
Vautour fauve – Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus), Tikjda, Algeria (Photo: Mustapha Hamoudi / Blida city).
  • Aegypius monachus – Vautour moine – Cinereous Vulture: disparu comme nicher du Maroc  et de l’Algérie. Il  n’a jamais niché en Tunisie.
Cinereous Vulture (Aegypius monachus)
Vautour moine – Cinereous Vulture (Aegypius monachus), (photo: Carlos Sanchez Along / Arkive.org)
  • Torgos tracheliotos – Vautour oricou – Lappet-faced Vulture: disparu comme nicheur dans les 3 pays depuis plusieurs décennies.
Lappet-faced Vulture (Torgos tracheliotos) hunted in Tunisia
Vautour oricou – Lappet-faced Vulture (Torgos tracheliotos) hunted in Tunisia in 1915 (photo: Abdelkader Jebali / Tunisia Wildlife Conservation Society)

Remerciements:

Merci à tous les photographes pour leurs photos. Nous avons essayé d’inclure le plus grand nombre d’images prises dans la région (6 espèces).

References:

  • Chenchouni, H., Righi , Y. & Si Bachir, A. 2007. Mise à jour et statut écologique de l’avifaune des Aurès. Acte des Journées Internationales sur la Zoologie Agricole et Forestière. Institut National Agronomique, El Harrach, Alger: 08-10 avril 2007.
  • Moroccan Birds. 2014. First record of White-backed Vulture for Morocco and North Africa. May 2014.
  • Isenmann, P., & Moali, A. 2000. Oiseaux d’Algérie / Birds of Algeria. SEOF, Paris.
  • Isenmann, P., Gaultier, T., El Hili, A., Azafzaf, H., Dlensi, H. & Smart, M. 2005. Oiseaux de Tunisie / Birds of Tunisia. SEOF, Paris.
  • Thévenot, M., Vernon, R. & Bergier, P. 2003. The birds of Morocco. BOU Checklist No. 20. BOU, Tring.