Habitat use and distribution of the Ruddy Shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea) in the wetland complex of Oued Righ, Algerian Sahara

Nouidjem, Y., Saheb, M., Bensaci, E., Bouzegag, A., Guergueb, E.-Y. & Houhamdi, M. (2015). Habitat use and distribution of the Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea in the wetland complex of Oued Righ (Algerian Sahara). Zoology and Ecology 25(1): 26–33. doi:10.1080/21658005.2014.997995
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Abstract:

Our study conducted from August 2007 to May 2011 in the main wetlands of the Oued Righ complex (Eastern Sahara of Algeria) aimed to study the habitat use and distribution pattern of the Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea. As the species was recorded breeding at most sites of the wetland complex, it was given the resident breeder status, which differs from the one it had previously. The maximum number of Ruddy Shelducks (284 individuals) was recorded each year during the winter season (second half of December). The Ruddy Shelduck (60% of population) shows preference for shallow middle-sized salt ponds with a high proportion of open water (e.g. Chott Tindla and Chott Sidi Slimane). No interannual variations were observed in habitat use; moreover, seasonal variations in the use of shallow salt pond habitat may be the outcome of hot and dry climate of this arid region.

Ruddy Shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea), Timgad, Batna, Algeria

Ruddy Shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea), Timgad, (W. Batna), north-eastern Algeria. (photo: Raouf Guechi).

Distribution, breeding and time budget of Ruddy Shelduck in the Hauts Plateaux, Algeria

Boulkhssaïm, M., Ouldjaoui, A., Alfarhan, A. H. & Samraoui, B. (2013). Distribution, breeding phenology and time budget of Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea during the annual cycle in the Hauts Plateaux, north-east Algeria. Ostrich 84 (2): 129-136.   DOI:10.2989/00306525.2013.821680
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Abstract:

Between September 2003 and July 2006, the reproductive biology and time budget of the Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea was studied in the wetland complex of Oum el Bouaghi, north-east Algeria. Our results indicate a marked post-breeding dispersal of the Ruddy Shelduck to the eastern Hauts Plateaux where more than 1 000 birds (one-third of the estimated north-west African population) may gather in autumn. Dispersal is again conspicuous at the end of the wintering period when most birds leave the area to return to their breeding grounds. In 2004 and 2005, successful nesting was recorded at five sites. In both years, territoriality was exhibited from March to June and broods, ranging from nine to 14 chicks (mean = 11.1 ± 1.8, N = 16), were recorded between 21 May and 7 July. We also monitored the diurnal time budget of the Ruddy Shelduck over a two-year period. Feeding, most intense in late autumn and winter, occupied 50.6% of the daily activities with a distinct gradual seasonal decrease coinciding with the start of the breeding period. Ruddy Shelduck relied more upon surface feeding in shallow waters but displayed flexibility of feeding behaviour when water level fluctuated.

Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea (Sergey Yeliseev, license CC-by-nc-nd)

Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea (Sergey Yeliseev, license CC-by-nc-nd)