Monitoring Mediterranean Lesser Crested Terns (Thalasseus bengalensis emigratus) in Libya

RAC/SPA-UNEP/MAP, 2014. Monitoring Mediterranean Lesser Crested Terns Thalasseus bengalensis emigratus. By Baccetti N. and Zenatello M. (Ed.), RAC.SPA, Tunis. 26p + Appendices. PDF

Summary:

The Mediterranean Lesser Crested Terns, Thalasseus bengalensis emigratus, is a Mediterranean endemic seabird, potentially vulnerable to many sources of threat. In 2012, within the framework of the MedMPAnet Project, a study was conducted on this species in Libya, especially in Garah, a potential future MPA where the largest fraction of the seabird global population is concentrated.

Actions and methods are described to monitor the breeding population of the Mediterranean Lesser Crested Tern, which is currently confined to Libya. The aim is providing a tool which will allow a coherent and safe approach to a population of extremely high conservation value, which is potentially vulnerable to many sources of threat, not least monitoring itself.

Assessing changes in population size, distribution and breeding success is crucial for conservation. We attempted to gather recent experiences carried out under the RAC-SPA umbrella to produce a document available for further sharing, that may ensure a correct continuation of activities in the next future. The monitoring guide of the Mediterranean Lesser Crested Tern population is now available on-line at the RAC-SPA website.

 Adult Mediterranean Lesser Crested Tern (Thalasseus bengalensis emigrates) and ringed juvenile at Garah, Libya

Adult Mediterranean Lesser Crested Terns (Thalasseus bengalensis emigrates) and ringed juvenile (c. 10 days old) at Garah, Libya. (photo: J. Sultana).

Breeding colony of the Mediterranean Lesser Crested Terns (Thalasseus bengalensis emigrates) at Garah, Libya

Breeding colony of the Mediterranean Lesser Crested Terns (Thalasseus bengalensis emigrates) at Garah, Libya. (photo: J. Sultana).

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